Prevalence and Incidence of Diagnosed Diabetes in US Subpopulations

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  • In many subpopulations, trends in the prevalence and incidence of diagnosed diabetes were similar to overall trends. Substantial increases were seen around 1990 that lasted 15 to 20 years before leveling off or decelerating.
  • Exceptions:
    • Age
      • Prevalence continued to increase at a significantly greater rate for young adults aged 20 to 44 years compared with those older (for interaction, P=0.04 for those aged 45-64 years; P=0.003 for those aged 65-79 years).
      • Incidence rates continued to increase at a greater rate for adults aged 20 to 44 years compared with those aged 45 to 64 years (P=0.03)
    • Education
      • The rate of increase in prevalence was higher for adults who had a high school education or less compared with those who had more than a high school education (for interaction, P=0.006 for less than high school and P<0.001 for high school)
    • Race/ethnicity
      • The rate of increase in prevalence was higher for Hispanic adults compared with non-Hispanic black adults (P=.01 for interaction).
      • Incidence rates continued to increase at a greater rate among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults than non-Hispanic white adults (for interaction, P=0.03 for non-Hispanic black adults and P= 0.01 for Hispanic adults)

Geiss LS, Wang J, Cheng YJ, et al. Prevalence and incidence trends for diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 20 to 79 years, United States, 1980-2012. JAMA. 2014;312(12):1218-1226.

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November 2014

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